Tag Archives: building conceptual knowledge

Cultural Literacy: The Monroe Doctrine

If you scroll down one post below this one, you’ll find another Cultural Literacy worksheet on Manifest Destiny. To add a corollary to that, here is another Cultural Literacy worksheet, this one on the Monroe Doctrine.

It is this policy, I think, that has led the United States into making common cause with vicious tyrants across Latin America, but particularly General Augusto Pinochet, Rafael Trujillo, three members of the Somoza Family, and the genocidal Guatemalan strongman, Efrain Rios Montt–and calling him genocidal is no exaggeration, reader, as this particular moral cretin was on trial for genocide when he died.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Puerto Rico

Here is a reading on Puerto Rico and a comprehension worksheet to accompany it in observance of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: The Age of Exploration

Here are two independent practice worksheets on the the Age of Exploration, the historical event that was a catastrophe for indigenous Americans and a bonanza for the Spanish and Portuguese explorers who “discovered” the Americas, and in any case gave birth to the Latin American world.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Reconquista

Here at Mark’s Text Terminal chagrin has arrived with the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018. As I marshall materials for material to post for the month, I find my archives nearly empty. What makes this especially embarrassing is the fact that I work in an inner-city high school with a substantial population of teenagers whose families hail from across the Hispanic world.

So some of the material that I post this month, I’m sorry to say, may in fact be a bit of a stretch in terms of relevance to the letter of Hispanic Heritage Month. This reading on the reconquista and its accompanying comprehension worksheet may indeed epitomize that stretch. In any case, however, I think these are useful documents for any high school global studies course. What do you think?

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 14, 2018

It’s second Friday of our school year here in New York. The first month of school is always a long haul as programming works out, and teachers get to know students. We’ve had one of the sides of Hurricane Florence passing through here this week, so stultifying humidity and the constant threat of rain hangs over the region.

This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan introducing personal pronouns. I use this Everyday Edit worksheet on Pocahontas to begin the lesson; should the lesson go into a second day due to unforeseen circumstances I keep this Cultural Literacy worksheet on satire nearby to start the conclusion of the lesson on that second day. This is the scaffolded worksheet that is the center of the lesson, and here is teacher’s copy of same.

That’s it for this week. Tomorrow begins Hispanic Heritage Month 2018, which runs through October 15. Mark’s Text Terminal will regularly feature, as in years past, materials related to Hispanic Heritage and History for the next four or so weeks.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Fallow (adj)

While I sit here waiting for files to back up to a flash drive, I’ll take a minute to post this context clues worksheet on the adjective fallow. If memory serves, and I’m confident it does, I wrote this to assist students in developing the concept of a fallow farm field for a co-teacher’s lesson on the medieval agricultural practice of three-field crop rotation.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Brainstorming the College Application Essay

Here are a couple of things I whipped up this morning for use in class tomorrow: the first is a worksheet on brainstorming the college application essay; the second is this learning support that attends it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.