Tag Archives: building conceptual knowledge

Nativism

If there is a better time to post this reading on nativism and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet, I can’t imagine when it would be.

And stay tuned, please, for a forthcoming review essay on nationalism in the United States in the nineteenth century which will contain the ingredients for an interdisciplinary unit on that subject–and, of course, the concept of nationalism and ethnic chauvinism.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ally (n), Ally (vi/vt)

Today’s Word of the Day from Merriam-Webster is “grubstake,” which I figured I could pass on. However, you might find that this context clues worksheet on ally as a noun and this one on the word as a verb–used, as above, both intransitively and transitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Howard Hughes

Somehow, about six years ago, a struggling student I served improbably found her way to the late Jonathan Demme’s early and critically acclaimed film “Melvin and Howard.” The film is a fictionalized account of Melvin Dummar’s account of encountering Hughes in the Utah desert and giving him a ride to Las Vegas. You can click through on the links to read more about this implausible story.

Anyway, my students, an inquisitive young woman, wanted to know more about Howard Hughes. I worked up this reading on Howard Hughes and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet to supply her with some context for understanding the story in “Melvin and Howard.” Incidentally, I watched the movie myself and didn’t care much for it. Having since seen several of his films, I learned that Jonathan Demme just wasn’t my kind of filmmaker, though I did think his rendition of “The Silence of the Lambs” was the best of the various productions around the legend of brilliant serial killer, cannibal, and psychiatrist Hannibal Lecter.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Concluding Lesson Plan on Verbs

If you are a user of this blog, then you may know that I have been, over time, posting all the materials I’ve developed for using the parts of speech to bolster literacy. Since the COVID19 pandemic began, I’ve posted a series of lesson plans on verbs. In fact, with this post, I will have published the entire twelve-lesson unit on verbs that I used in the classroom for several years.

So, if you have accumulated the other eleven lessons, then here is the final lesson plan on verbs, the assessment, for this verbs unit. I open this lesson with this worksheet on the homophones there, their, and they’re. If this lesson continues into a second day (and you’ll see that it is almost inevitable that it will), then here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on National Poetry Month. (If you and your students like the procedural knowledge practice the Everyday Edit worksheets offer you, then you will be pleased to hear that the good people at Education World give away an entire year’s supply of these short exercises.)

Here is the worksheet that serves as a final assessment for the verbs unit posted on this blog.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Demure (adj)

It’s Merriam-Webster’s word of the day for today, so here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective demure. I’ve always thought of this as one of those locutions the great Joseph Mitchell called “tinsel words,” but maybe students ought to know it anyway, even if just to understand the meaning of the expression “tinsel word.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Atlanta

Here is a reading on Atlanta and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. It’s a short history of the city if you have students interested.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on the Fall of Rome

OK! This lesson plan on the Fall of Rome, as below, is the tenth of ten lessons, logically and chronologically, from a global studies unit on ancient Rome.

This lesson opens, if you are so inclined, with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on, unsurprisingly, the fall of Rome. If the lesson continues into a second day, then you might want this context clues worksheet on the verb submit, which is used both intransitively and transitively.

And, lastly for this, the tenth of ten posts (see below), here is the short reading and comprehension questions that are the principal work of this lesson.

That’s it. I hope this material is useful.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Constantine I

Moving along to number nine in a global studies unit of ten lessons on ancient Rome, here is a lesson plan on Constantine I, the first Christian emperor of Rome.

I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun wrath; if the lesson goes into a second day as you use it (and as I intended for my own use), then here is another context clues worksheet on the noun legacy.

This is the reading on Constantine I and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet that are the work of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Rome and Christianity

As above and below, this lesson plan on Rome and Christianity is number eight of a ten-lesson global studies unit on ancient Rome.

This lesson opens with this context clues worksheet on the noun treaty as well as a on the verb unite (it’s used both intransitively and transitively) if the lesson, as I intended for my own use, continues into a second day. And here is the reading and comprehension questions that are at the center of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on the Pax Romana

This lesson plan on the Pax Romana is the seventh of a ten-lesson global studies unit on ancient Rome (as above and below–a run, all told, of twenty posts, ten of them documents posts).

Here’s a context clues worksheet on the noun orator and a second on the noun truce for opening this lesson. And here is the short reading with comprehension questions that is the primary work of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.