Tag Archives: art

Abstract Expressionism (n)

“An umbrella term which refers to that direction in abstract art characterized by spontaneous and individual abstract expression in a non-objective manner. While the term was first applied to certain of Vassily Kandinsky’s early experimental paintings, it mostly refers to artists working in the 1940s and 1950s, including Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock. Sharing a similar outlook rather than a style, these artists sought total freedom for psychic expression on the canvas. Believed by some to be the first truly American art, the movement is also called the New York School because its international center was New York City. The influence of abstract expressionism extended into the 1970s with Lyrical Abstraction.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Abstract Art (n)

“Art in which elements of form have been stressed in handling the subject matter–which may or may not be recognizable. Abstraction is a relative term; all artworks exist on a continuum between total abstraction and full representation. Vassily Kandinsky is generally credited with having created the first purely abstract artwork in 1910.

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Churrigueresque (adj)

“A 17th-century Spanish architectural style named after the Churriguera family of architects and designers. The influence of sculpture most characterizes the style, as structural elements become mere props for ornament. While the style predominates n Castile, the term often refers to the florid, late Baroque architecture of Spain and Latin America.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Orphism (n)

“An aspect of Cubism, sometimes called Orphic Cubism, explored by Robert Delaunay beginning about 1912. The primacy of color and color relationships in the making of the picture was the keynote, although Delaunay himself alternated during this phase between pure Abstraction and quasi-Representational forms.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Francisco de Goya

Somewhere in the shuffle of documents for posts in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018 (and those for 2016 and 2017 as well) l misplaced this reading on Francisco de Goya and the comprehension worksheet that complements it. He’s a key late-Enlightenment figure, and this reading has some key points on art history.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Naive Art (n)

“Primarily understood as works produced by artists who lack formal training, although trained artists may deliberately affect a naive style. The term most clearly describes such early-20th-century artists as the Douanier Rousseau, whose childlike, non-naturalistic paintings completed in bright colors influenced early modern artists. Their apparent affinity with non-Western art and their bold expressiveness made them appealing to the early Modernists searching for new forms of expression.

See ‘Outsider’ art.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Raku (n)

“Coarse-grained, low-fired, and soft-glazed pottery ware developed by the Japanese for articles used in the tea ceremony. It is notable for its refined rusticity.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.