Tag Archives: art

Silk Screen

“Silk Screen: A stencil process of color reproduction, often used commercially to reproduce posters, etc. The design is divided according to color areas. For each color, a stencil is prepared on silk stretched over a frame. Paint is the squeezed through the respective screens. Andy Warhol used this technique extensively. Also called serigraphy.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Andy Warhol

We’ve had early frosts in Vermont. According to Vermont Public Radio’s excellent weather service, “An Eye on the Sky,” these are some of the earliest killing frosts in this state in decades.

All of this is the long way around to say that while I wait for the air to warm this morning before I go out on my constitutional, I’ll take a minute to post this reading on Andy Warhol and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. Whatever one thinks of Mr. Warhol or his artistic output, there is no denying his presence and perhaps even his importance in American culture.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 18 2020: Hispanic Heritage Month Week I–A Reading and Comprehension Worksheet on Diego Rivera

If you’ve never seen the paintings of Diego Rivera, you’re in for a treat. In observance of the first week of Hispanic Heritage Month 2020 (it runs between September 15 and October 15), on Mark’s Text Terminal, the Weekly Text is a reading on Diego Rivera along with its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review

Mozarabe Style

“Mozarabe Style: Describes a tradition of art developed by the Christians (mozarabes) who lived in those parts of Spain under Muslim rule from the 8th to the 15th centuries. The Mozarabe style was primarily associated with church architecture and was often characterized by the horseshoe arch, a holdover from Visigothic times.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Fascist Aesthetic

Fascist Aesthetic: Associated primarily with Hitler, Mussolini, and Franco, this was art with propagandistic intentions clearly outlined in realist styles, giving it a close resemblance to socialist realism. In Germany, images of youthful blonds reflected myths of Aryan superiority, while the heavy, grandiose architecture at Munich and Nuremberg proclaimed an imperial destiny inherited from antiquity. It strongly contrasts with modern art, dubbed degenerate (entartete) by Hitler.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Flying Buttress

“Flying Buttress: A bridge of masonry that transmits the thrust of a vault or roof to an outer support. Characteristic of Gothic architecture.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Environment Art

Environment Art: Not to be confused with earth art, in its broadest sense earth art refers to the work of artists who manipulate the man-made environment. Controlled spaces, whether sculpted or constructed of building materials or light beams or sound—are intended to be experienced with all the senses. A major theme has been the fusion of architecture and sculpture in a room space that surrounds the entering viewer, such as the life-size, three-dimensional tableaux created by Edward Kienholz. Environment art has appeared sporadically in several 20th-century movements, including Dada, surrealism, and pop art.

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Local Color

“Local Color: System of representing the color of an object which begins with its hue and adds shade or lightness by the addition of black or white pigment to give a more naturalistic appearance. Pure or shaded local color was used almost exclusively until the late 19th century, when the Impressionists discovered that the brain blends contrasting hues into vibrant impressions of actual color.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Frottage

“Frottage: (Fr., rubbing) Technique of capturing designs and textural effects by placing paper over objects that have raised surfaces and rubbing the paper with graphite, wax crayon, etc. Also called rubbing, it is a popular way of copying forms in nature.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Soft Sculpture

“Soft Sculpture: Sculpture made of pliable and sometimes impermanent materials, such as latex, vinyl, feathers, rope and string, hair, etc. Seen since the early 1960s, soft sculpture defies the tradition of hard and permanent material as the only suitable medium for sculpture. Artists from various movements, including Arte Povera, Pop Art, and Surrealism, have experimented with soft sculpture.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.