Tag Archives: almanac

Decimate (vt)

Today is August 23. On this day in 1977, Bryan Allen achieved the first human powered flight by pedaling the Gossamer Condor, an aircraft designed by Paul MacReady, in a figure-eight course. Mr. Allen would go on to power another flight across the English Channel in the Gossamer Albatross, another of Paul Mac Ready’s designs. In 1927, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, in a gross miscarriage of justice, were executed at the Charlestown State Prison in Massachusetts. Finally, today is the birthday (1912-1996) of the incomparable Gene Kelly.

Here is a context clues worksheet the verb decimate. It’s used transitively, and most frequently, strictly speaking, erroneously. It’s from the Latin (nota bene the Latin root dec, which means ten, and shows up in words like decade and decimal–a form of counting that proceeds in units of ten) and means, in its definition from Rome, where it was a means of disciplining Legions, “to select by lot and kill every tenth man of.” However, over time, it has come to mean “to reduce drastically especially in number” and “to cause great destruction or harm to.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, August 9, 2018

Today is August 9. On this day in 1945, three days after the atomic bomb fell on Hiroshima, a plutonium bomb called Fat Man was dropped on the Japanese city of Nagasaki. In 1974, while I was away at the Philmont Boy Scout Ranch in Cimarron, New Mexico, Richard Nixon, engulfed in the Watergate scandal, resigned the presidency. Today is Singapore’s National Day, which celebrates that nation’s independence from Malaysia, which it achieved in 1956.

This week’s Text is four parsing sentences worksheet for nouns. These are pretty simple literacy exercises designed to get students reading and understanding the structure of basic declarative sentences by analyzing the parts of speech in them.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Postcolonialism

Today is August 6. On this day in 1945, the United States dropped “Little Boy,” the nation’s first atomic bomb used in combat, on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Sir Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of penicillin, was born on this day in 1881. It’s the anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, which President Lyndon Johnson signed into law on this day in 1965. Finally, this is Bolivian Independence Day

So today seems like an appropriate time to post this reading on postcolonialism along with the comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: The Magna Carta

Today is August 5. On this day in 1912, the Swedish diplomat (and architect and businessman) Raoul Wallenberg was born. It is also the birthday (1930) of Neil Armstrong. In 1957, on this day, American Bandstand (a show, for some reason, I always hated, even as a kid) made its national premiere on ABC.

Here is an independent practice assignment on the Magna Carta which is a key event in world history, as well as a key concept in social studies, i.e. limiting the power of leaders.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ibn al-Nafis

Today is August 4. It’s the birthday of the great Louis Armstrong! On this day in 1964, after disappearing on June 21 in Philadelphia, Mississippi, the bodies of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael (“Mickey”) Schwerner were discovered. The three were in Mississippi doing civil rights work, namely registering Americans of African descent to vote. If you’ve seen the 1988 movie “Mississippi Burning,” then you basically know this disgraceful story.

Here is a reading on the Muslim physician Ibn al-Nafis who was the first doctor to map the human pulmonary system. This comprehension worksheet accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, August 3, 2018

Today is August 3. Today is Independence Day in Niger. Today is the birthday of legendary journalist Ernie Pyle. Today is also the birthday of John T. Scopes, whose teaching of evolution in Tennessee violated that state’s Butler Act, which led to the infamous Scopes Monkey Trial. (And even though it is a based on the play of the same name, and therefore a drama, Inherit the Wind gives a decent account of the events of the trial and is in any case a great movie.)

This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan on the Latin word root ver–it means true. This do-now exercise on the noun integrity serves well to open the lesson and hint at the meaning of the word root. Finally, this word root worksheet is the mainstay of the lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: The Nobel Prize

Today is August 2. On this day in 1924, James Baldwin was born (and if you haven’t seen Raoul Peck’s excellent documentary on Mr. Baldwin, I Am Not Your Negro, let me once more recommend it). While we here in the United States celebrate our Independence Day on July 4, the Declaration of Independence was not actually signed until this day in 1776. In Macedonia, today is Republic Day, which is also known as Illenden.

Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Nobel Prize which seems somehow appropriate on this day. I wonder if he’d lived longer, if James Baldwin might have received it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, July 27, 2018

Today is July 27. On this day in 1953, United States and North Korean delegates signed the Korean Armistice Agreement, which ended the Korean War. In the United States, if is National Korean War Veterans Day. On this day in 1789, the United States Congress created the first presidential cabinet department, the Department of State.

Apropos of that founding, this week’s Text is a reading on the Treaty of Versailles along with the comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Dictate (v)

Today is July 25. In Spain, it is Saint James Day. Today is the birthday of Maxfield Parrish. On this day in 1965, Bob Dylan “went electric” at the Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island to the consternation of the folk music fans in attendance.

Here is a context clues worksheet on the verb dictate. You’ll notice it’s part of a pattern over the last several posts.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Agenda (n)

Today is July 22. On this day in 1934, John Dillinger gave up the ghost after leaving the Biograph Theater in Chicago, where a group of FBI agents awaited him. He was Public Enemy No. 1 at the time of his death. Today is the birthday of William Archibald Spooner, the Oxford Don who gave the world the “spoonerism.”

Here is a context clues worksheet on the noun agenda, which seems like a word high schoolers ought to know.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.