Tag Archives: almanac

Independent Practice: Incan Civilization

Okay, today is Yom Kippur. I bid all my Jewish colleagues, friends, neighbors, and students a righteous and reflective holiday.

Continuing with Hispanic Heritage Month 2018 on Mark’s Text Terminal, here are two independent practice worksheets on Incan Civilization.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Its (Possessive Pronoun) and It’s (Contraction)

Today is September 2. Today is the anniversary of the implementation–in Britain and its colonies–of the Calendar (New Style) Act 1750, which made the “Georgian Correction” in 1752. On this day in 1945, the official ratification of Japan’s surrender to the victorious allies in World War II occurred aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. In Vietnam, today is National Day, which celebrates that nation’s independence from France.

Here are five homophone worksheets on its and it’s. I guess, strictly speaking, these aren’t really homophones, since they both employ it, a neuter pronoun with a fixed meaning. These worksheets really address the punctuation of these words. Students, particularly English language learners in my experience, accustomed to forming the possessive case of nouns with an apostrophe find the punctuation of these two words counterintuitive. Thus,  these worksheets to provide some practical experience using this pronoun in these two forms in sentences.

The worksheets themselves have a somewhat lengthy excursus, in their definition of its, on pronoun-antecedent agreement when using this possessive pronoun. That material derives from my study, a few years back, of the Trivium and its possibilities for use in my classroom. The book I read went on at some length, as I recall, about the importance to logic and grammar of not using locutions like “the committee did their work” and favoring “the committee did its work”.  I suspect that in some cases that material would be better deployed on an entirely separate series of worksheets that contrast its and their in pronoun-antecedent grammar exercises.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Abraham Lincoln

Today is September 1. It’s Emma Nutt Day, in celebration of the Ms Nutt’s post as the first female telephone operator in the world. In Slovakia, today is Constitution Day.  It’s also Independence Day in Uzbekistan, celebrating that nation’s independence from the Soviet Union.

Maybe you can use this reading on Abraham Lincoln. If so, then here is the reading comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hagia Sophia

Wow. it’s August 31st. Where did the summer go? It’s Independence Day in Kyrgyzstan, another Central Asian nation that emerged from the wreckage of the Soviet Union in 1991. Today is Hari Merdeka in Malaysia, a celebration of that nation’s independence from Britain in 1957.

Here is a reading on the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, and the comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Complete Introductory Lesson to Verbs

Today is August 29. It’s the anniversary of the death of Edmond Hoyle, whose name is synonymous with playing card games by the rules (or, “According to Hoyle”). Ingrid Bergman was born on this day in 1915. It’s also the birthday of the great alto saxophonist Charlie Parker, by any measure a major figure in American culture and a musician I’ve loved since I was a teenager myself.

Here’s another late-summer Text, this one, a complete introductory lesson plan for verbs. At the change of class, when students arrive and need a moment of assistance to settle, I use this Cultural Literacy exercise on verbs; in case the lesson goes into a second day, for whatever reason, I keep this Everyday Edit worksheet on Poe’s ‘The Raven'” ready (and, incidentally, you can find a year’s worth of Everyday Edit worksheets at Education World, where the proprietors of that site give them away). The mainstay of this lesson is this scaffolded worksheet on identifying and using verbs. Finally, you might want teacher’s copy of the worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: Monarchy

Today is August 27. Today is Independence Day in Moldova, celebrating that republic’s departure from the Soviet Union in 1991. On this day in 1859, the Drake Well in Titusville, Pennsylvania, at a depth of 69 feet, struck oil, thus opening the first commercial petroleum well in the United States. In 1665 on this day in Acomac, Virginia, the first live theater was presented in the British North American colonies, to with Ye Bare and Ye Cubb by Philip Alexander. It’s the birthday of United States President Lyndon Baines Johnson; it is also, in one of those coincidences I tend to notice, the birthday of Pee-wee Herman (aka, particularly one imagines, to his parents, Paul Reubens).

Here is an independent practice worksheet on monarchy, which calls upon students to understand monarchy as a concept.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Constitutional Convention

Today is August 26. It’s the birthday of legendary American inventor Lee de Forest, who was something of a one-man Silicon Valley of his time. On this day in 1883, in Indonesia, Krakatoa erupted. In the United States, today is Women’s Equality Day, which observes and celebrates the adoption, in 1920, of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. In 1939, the Cincinnati Reds and the Brooklyn Dodgers played a doubleheader at Ebbets Field which was the first major league baseball game broadcast on television. Finally, it’s the birthday of Branford Marsalis, a member of one of our nation’s most prominent musical families and an artist I greatly respect.

Here is a reading on the United States Constitutional Convention along with a comprehension worksheet to accompany it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.