Category Archives: Social Studies

Lesson plans that use the high school social studies curriculum to build literacy and learning skills.

The Weekly Text, August 3, 2017

Here are two context clues worksheets on the verb descend and the noun descendant. As you will infer from the choice of the noun, these are the definitions of these words that relate to origins rather than moving in a downward direction. I like to use these early in the year in global studies classes.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Conspire (vt./vi.)

On my penultimate morning in Vermont, here is  a context clues worksheet on the verb conspire. The dictionary indicates it is used transitively and intransitively, though it looks like it is almost always used intransitively.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Schism

On a bright, cool morning in Springfield, Vermont, I offer you this Cultural Literacy worksheet on schism. By their senior year at the very least, this is a word and concept high school students really ought to know.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Right of Privacy

Now seems like a perfect time to post a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the right of privacy.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Censure (vt.)

There might be a better way than this context clues worksheet on the verb censure (it’s transitive only) to teach the word, and I may have started a draft on a homophone worksheet on censure and censor, which would be more efficient. Stay tuned, because I’ll post such a thing, when and if I write, sooner or later.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

 

Cultural Literacy: Xenophobia

Here, for what I assume are obvious reasons besides a complement to the worksheet on the Greek word root xen/o (foreign) I posted a couple of days ago, is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on xenophobia.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Arthr/o

Here is a short worksheet on the Greek word root arthr/o, which means joint.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.