Category Archives: Social Studies

Lesson plans that use the high school social studies curriculum to build literacy and learning skills.

A Short Reading on Thucydides

Here, if you can use it, is an Intellectual Devotional reading on the Greek historian Thucydides. You may also want to use this reading comprehension worksheet to accompany it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Marginal Tax Rate

Because I work in a economics and finance-themed high school, I had call for this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the marginal tax rate.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Peter the Great

Here’s a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Peter the Great that might be useful in a global studies class.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 16, 2017

Since the idea of success is something schools now flog, albeit in a vapid and decontextualized sense, we should not be surprised to learn that when we talk, in our social studies classes, about successors–to thrones, offices, and the like–our students understand this as someone who has experienced success, rather than someone who has succeeded in the sense of following someone else in a position of power or authority.

This week’s Text, in an attempt to clear up this misconception, is three context clues worksheets on succession, successor, and successive, which are, respectively, a noun, a noun, and an adjective.

That’s it: I hope you find these useful.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Textile (n.)

If you teach social studies, you might be able to use this context clues worksheet on the noun textile. It’s a term that repeats a sufficient number of times in the curriculum, I would think, that we ought to help students gain mastery of it as early as possible.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Alienation

Because I think it’s a concept high school students ought to understand, I offer this Cultural Literacy worksheet on alienation this morning.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Fiorello LaGuardia

If you teach in New York City (or somewhere else, and want to introduce students to one of the most dedicated and selfless public servants in the 20th century), you might find this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Fiorello LaGuardia useful.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.