Category Archives: Short Exercises

In the New York City Department of Education, these kinds of worksheets are called “Do-Nows.” They are short bursts of work, generally related to the day’s lesson, to open a class period. This kind of work is especially useful with students who struggle with class transitions; they work well to get kids focused and settled.

Emigrate (vi)

A colleague with whom I team-teach a sophomore global studies asked me to develop a context clues worksheet on the noun emigre. It means, of course, emigrant. So instead I wrote this context clues worksheet on the verb emigrate. It’s used intransitively; I plan to teach it, then point out, by way of a simple question (“What do you suppose we call someone who emigrates?”), to students that someone who emigrates is an emigrant. From there it’s a small step to point out that the French word for emigrant is emigre (it is the past participle of the French verb emigrer–“to emigrate”–if you must know).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Transitive Verb

Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the transitive verb that I just now used in a lesson on transitive and intransitive verbs. It’s a quick way to introduce the skill of recognising and correctly using these two type of verbs.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, October 13, 2017

Today is the final Friday of National Hispanic Heritage Month. This week, Mark’s Text Terminal offers a reading on the Panama Canal together with this comprehension worksheet to accompany it.

I debated myself at some length about whether or not these materials properly fit with the idea of National Hispanic Heritage month. In the final analysis, I think this short article does a nice job of exposing the kind of imperial meddling Latin Americans have dealt with for centuries.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

 

Bogus (adj.)

Should fate somehow require you to teach a lesson on Bill & Ted, you’ll probably find this context clues worksheet on the adjective bogus useful.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Concise (adj.)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective concise, a word, and certainly a concept, students should understand by the time they graduate high school.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Coalition (n.)

You might find this context clues worksheet on the noun coalition helpful in assisting your social studies students in understanding this noun.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Primogeniture

Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on primogeniture, a concept that almost certainly recurs in most high school social studies classes.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.