Category Archives: Short Exercises

In the New York City Department of Education, these kinds of worksheets are called “Do-Nows.” They are short bursts of work, generally related to the day’s lesson, to open a class period. This kind of work is especially useful with students who struggle with class transitions; they work well to get kids focused and settled.

The Weekly Text, June 23, 2017

Summer break is nigh upon us here in New York City, and not a moment too soon. For the past couple of weeks we have endured the inanity of the New York State Regents Examinations.

This week’s Text is a complete lesson on using the predicate adjective in declarative sentences. There are two do-now worksheets to accompany this lesson in the event that the lesson runs into two days: the first is an Everyday Edit on Laura Ingalls Wilder; the second is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the common Latinism in English, nota bene. This lesson also provides a a word bank of predicate adjectives that serves as a learning support. You’ll need this scaffolded worksheet on the predicate adjectives for your students; to deliver this lesson, I find it’s handy to have this teacher’s copy and answer key.

That’s it. I hope this is useful to you.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Mis/o

Here is a short exercise on the Greek word root mis/o. Neither you nor your students will need to look hard or far to see that this means to hate.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Marginal Tax Rate

Because I work in a economics and finance-themed high school, I had call for this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the marginal tax rate.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Abundant (adj.)

Here, on a beautiful Wednesday morning in New York City, is a context clues worksheet on the adjective abundant. I’m always surprised at how many high school freshmen don’t know this word.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Xer/o, Xeri

Here, on a warm and muggy (yet quite chilly in this building, with the air conditioning laboring against less than one-tenth of the human bodies that normally complement this building) Tuesday morning is a short exercise on the Greek word roots xer/o and xeri. They mean dry.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Peter the Great

Here’s a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Peter the Great that might be useful in a global studies class.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Regal (adj.)

It’s Monday morning, and I’m back at work after a humid and therefore lazy weekend. Before I go downstairs to proctor New York State Regents, I’ll take a moment to post this context clues worksheet on the adjective regal.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.